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Whiplash symptoms Core Chiropractic Brooklyn Ohio

Whiplash Symptoms – Hard to Understand

Whiplash Symptoms May Be Hard for Others to Understand

A whiplash injury occurs when the head and neck (cervical spine) unexpectedly get whipped back and forth. In today’s world, this injury most commonly happens when hit from behind by a vehicle.

If your whiplash symptoms linger, it may be hard for others to relate to what you’re going through.

Some questions could include:

“You felt fine after the accident. How can you be in so much pain and discomfort weeks later?”

“My friend recovered from whiplash within a few days. Maybe it’s just in your mind?”

Despite what other people might think, whiplash symptoms can indeed be mysterious and evolve over a period of weeks and months. Some symptoms may fade away as new ones develop. While most people fully recover from whiplash within 3 months, others may experience symptoms that last much longer and become chronic.

Let’s review some key facts about whiplash to help put this injury in perspective.

Pain can be delayed

We’re used to most collision injuries becoming painful immediately. For example, if you fall and land hard on your hand, it starts hurting right away. However, a whiplash injury may take up to 24 hours or more before it becomes painful.

It is not uncommon for someone to be rear-ended by another car and refuse medical attention at the scene, but then wake up the next day with neck pain.

Pain is not the only whiplash symptom

Neck pain, stiffness, and other aches in surrounding areas are commonly associated with whiplash injury. However, the symptoms are not always straightforward and can include whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) that go beyond just pain.

Some examples of whiplash symptoms include:

  • Dizziness
  • Vision problems
  • Emotional changes
  • Trouble with memory or concentration
  • Problems with getting enough sleep
  • Ringing in ears (tinnitus)
  • Difficulty with chewing, talking, and/or swallowing

Some whiplash-associated disorders may be related to a concussion that occurred during the collision, but the exact cause of these symptoms cannot always be accurately diagnosed.

Whiplash-associated disorders may go away quickly or last for months or longer. If left untreated, whiplash symptoms can increase fatigue, stress levels, and feelings of social isolation.

Seemingly minor collisions can cause whiplash

While there is a correlation between the collision’s force and severity of whiplash symptoms, sometimes the results can be surprising.

A couple examples include:

A lack of car damage can be misleading. In cases where a car looks OK after the collision, the forces that were not absorbed by the vehicle’s surface may instead go through the seat and worsen the whiplash. On the other hand, a car might have visible damage and/or look crunched-up, but the exterior absorbed more of the forces and possibly resulted in less whiplash.

Whiplash can occur at low speeds. Whiplash injuries have been reported in collisions of less than 10 miles per hour in the medical literature.1 Some people with weaker neck muscles or other conditions that make the cervical spine more susceptible to injury are likely factors.
See Diagnosing Whiplash

If you or a loved one suspect a whiplash injury has occurred, it’s important to consult with a doctor. Seeking treatment for whiplash sooner rather than later tends to result in better recovery outcomes.

As seen on Spine-Health.


IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING ANY WHIPLASH SYMPTOMS OR ANYTHING LISTED BELOW, WE WELCOME YOU TO CONTACT US AT 216-313-9044

 

Core Chiropractic Brooklyn Parma whiplash car accident treatment injury care best in Brooklyn Ohio

Neck Pain    Back Pain    Headaches
Muscle Spasms    Dizziness   Body Aches  
Pinched Nerves    Leg Pain/Numbness
Arm Pain/Numbness    Pain Between the Shoulders

 


better sleep osteoarthritis pain

9 Ways to Sleep Better with Osteoarthritis Pain

As if it’s not enough that your osteoarthritis bothers you throughout the day, pain and stiffness can also interrupt your ability to get a good night’s sleep.

This is bad news because poor sleep can cause pain to be worse—this creates a damaging cycle of pain and poor sleep.

If osteoarthritis pain and stiffness are keeping you from falling asleep or staying asleep, try following these 9 tips:

 

1 – Use heat therapy before bed

Ease a painful joint by using a heating pad for 15 to 20 minutes before bed. Or take a soothing bath for the same effect—just give yourself time to cool down afterward, because it’s hard to get to sleep if you’re overheated.

2 – Explore medication solutions

Insomnia and sleep problems may be the result of a medication you are taking to treat osteoarthritis pain or another condition. Talk with your doctor about switching medications or adjusting the timing of when you take them.

You may also be a good candidate for a prescription medication specifically to address insomnia. These medications can be very helpful but can be habit-forming and need to be taken with care.

3 – Take a nighttime pain reliever

There are several formulations of over-the-counter pain relievers specifically intended for use in at night to both relieve osteoarthritis pain and help you sleep better.

4 – Consider your mattress

A good mattress can make a big difference in your level of comfort and support as you sleep. For those with osteoarthritis, your mattress should be supportive but not too hard. If you can’t invest in a new mattress right now, consider adding a mattress topper.

5 – Use pillows strategically

Where and what type of pillows you use at night is important. If you have neck (cervical) arthritis, use a standard pillow that’s firm but not too high. For hip or knee arthritis, you may benefit from a wedge pillow next to you or a small pillow between your knees.

6 – Rule out sleep apnea

Those who are overweight or obese are at increased risk for both osteoarthritis and a sleep condition called sleep apnea, which causes patients to stop breathing and wake up abruptly several times a night. If you suspect you may have sleep apnea, talk with your doctor about undergoing a sleep study.

7 – Exercise and stretch

Your joints are meant to move—the more you keep them immobile, the stiffer and more painful they’ll become. Stay as active as you can and do stretches intended to maintain strength and range of motion in your osteoarthritis-affected joint.

8 – Practice good sleep hygiene

Follow habits that promote good sleep, such as:

  • Going to bed at the same time every night
  • Establishing a night routine to prepare your mind and body for sleep
  • Banning phones, TVs, and other electronics from the bedroom
  • Avoiding large meals and caffeine before bed

9 – Manage your osteoarthritis or other health conditions

The better your overall health, the less likely conditions like arthritis or others will disrupt your sleep.

Remember: osteoarthritis, chronic pain, and sleep problems are all treatable. If you’re struggling with poor sleep because of osteoarthritis pain, make an appointment to see us and explore your solutions.

Original article: Arthritis Health

 


If you’re suffering from osteoarthritis, come see us to find out about your options for treatment. Under our care, your treatment may include spinal adjustments, physical rehab, clinical massage, and stretching and strengthening exercises. We can also recommend natural, drug-free ways to control your pain and discomfort.

If you would like more information about our services and treatments available please contact us today!

Core Medical Group

 


Back Pain

5 Ways to Help Stop Back Pain

Roughly 8 out of 10 people suffer from back pain at some point during their lives.

Women, in particular, are prone to posture and back problems—thanks to toting around outrageously heavy purses, going through pregnancy, or giving one-hip rides to kids. Whether you’re in the midst of fighting the ache or just want to prevent it, here are some expert-endorsed quick-and-easy ways to wage your war on back pain.

Pass the broccoli, please

You know that calcium is key for strong bones, but Japanese researchers have identified something else you need: vitamin K. It’s believed that the vitamin, found in broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens, helps calcium deposit in the bones, making them denser. The stronger your bones, the stronger your whole body—and the lower your chances of an injury that could cause back pain.

Lighten your load

If your purse or briefcase tips the scales at more than 10% of your weight, it’s too heavy. And you need to carry it right. Your best bet is a model with a long strap that lets you position it across your chest like a messenger bag. Can’t part with your shorter-strapped number? Switch shoulders every 20 minutes.

Sleep right

A harder bed may not be better for your back. A recent study in Spine found that people who slept on softer beds reported less lower-back pain than those who snoozed on harder ones. 

Pillows? Yours shouldn’t raise your head out of alignment with your spine. How to tell: If you’re a back sleeper, your chin shouldn’t press into your chest. If you’re a side sleeper, it shouldn’t curve up toward your shoulder.

Tighten those abs

Having strong core muscles (we’re talking abs here) can help protect your back from injury. Do this core-strengthening pelvic tilt 2 to 3 times per week: Lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and lower back flattened. Pull in your belly button toward your spine, contracting your abs; your pelvis should lift slightly off the floor. 

Do 2 to 3 sets of 12 reps.

Aim for good posture

Sitting at a desk for eight (or more) hours a day can really do a number on your back. Make sure to sit with your back against your chair (get a lumbar pillow if your chair doesn’t allow this) and both feet flat on the floor.
Another option: Try using a stability ball as your desk chair—good posture is a must just to stay on the thing. Start off slow (20 minutes at a time), and if it feels good, stick with it.

 

Originally seen on Health

 

These 5 Tips not enough? 

Call today to alleviate your back pain and get your life back! 

Core Chiropractic & Rehabilitation

216-313-9044


seasonal affective disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Do these shorter, darker, and chillier days make your mood cloud over this time every year?

You’re not alone!

Roughly up to 20 percent of Americans report feeling tired or sad with the fewer hours of daylight in the late fall and winter months. With colder temperatures and crisp, blustery winds, it’s easy to give in and hit the snooze button one more time instead of dragging yourself to the gym before work — or, make a date with your couch, warm blankets, and Netflix instead of bundling up and getting dinner with family and friends.

While many people can still function even if they’re feeling a bit melancholy, for some, winter brings a clinical form of depression called Seasonal Affective Disorder, commonly (and ironically) referred to as SAD. Researchers estimate that at least 5% percent of the population experiences SAD symptoms during the shorter days of late-fall and winter, such as fatigue, overeating, loss of interest in activities and difficulty concentrating.

Fortunately, there are several easy ways to feel better and boost your mood if you’re experiencing an energy dip.

Here are some of the best-recommended ways to combat Seasonal Affective Disorder.

 

Rise and shine

The sun is rising earlier, so get up with the chickens, so to say. Bundle up and go for a morning walk around the block, to soak up some of that early morning sunshine.

Same as it ever was

Sticking to a normal routine helps keep your mood and day in balance. Don’t deviate from it if you feel blue, that’s your key to knowing you need to follow through. Don’t neglect your favorite activities just because it’s cold or getting dark early.

Garbage in garbage out

Don’t fall prey to loading up on sugar and comfort foods this time of year. Most people opt for sugary sweets because it gives them a temporary lift in mood, but come spring you’ll regret it with extra weight. Remember, you are what you eat!

Light it up

Consider getting light therapy or buying your own full spectrum UV light box. Research has shown that light therapy helps at least 50% of people who suffer from SAD. The bright light emitted from these devices helps the body awaken in the morning and decreases the hormone melatonin that keeps us asleep at night.

Hit Play

We don’t mean on the DVD player – get outside and enjoy yourself with loved ones this winter. From a friendly snowball fight with friends to cross-country skiing, ice skating, snowshoeing, or a simple hike on a groomed Metroparks path, get out there and find joy in wintertime activities.

Relax

A little downward dog might help lift you out of your funk. Try starting yoga or meditation to get your mind and body some uplifting energy this low light and energy season.

Prepare for take-off

If you have vacation time, book yourself a trip! Quality downtime and vacation are important to recharge and boost your mood. Studies show that people even experience pleasure and stress release from anticipating vacations. While you count down the days until your warm and sunny holiday, find ways to enjoy and be happy with the winter wonderland in your own backyard.

Get Adjusted

Studies show that getting chiropractic adjustments can help alleviate symptoms of depression. 

Our moods are regulated by our body’s chemistry; this chemistry in your organs, as well as your brain, are all regulated by the nervous system. Misalignment of the spine can cause pressure in the area of the brain stem which can cause interference neurologically and chemically.

Often people turn to medications that are used to alter their brain chemistry, but those looking for a non-medication therapy often find that re-aligning these vertebrae can do wonders for their mental state.

 


If you struggle with serious and continuous depressive symptoms, be sure to reach out to your healthcare provider to discuss your condition and options for treatment.


 

If you would like more information about the use of chiropractic care to deal with SAD, please contact us today!

Core Chiropractic & Rehabilitation

216-313-9044


autumn squash soup

Autumn Squash Soup Recipe

Colder weather is here, and that means comfort food.

Nothing is better in the colder weather than a piping hot bowl of soup!

Have you ever tried the sweet and savory Autumn Squash soup from Panera? It is amazing! After scouring the internet, we found an excellent and healthy copycat recipe for this delicious favorite on The Cafe Sucre Farine.

One minor modification to this recipe I would recommend is adding a bit of vanilla almond milk to the mix.

Let us know how you like this recipe!

 

Author: Chris Scheuer
Recipe type: Soup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large butternut squash, 2½-3 pounds
  • 1 medium sugar pumpkin, 2½-3 pounds
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large sweet yellow onion, peeled, halved and roughly chopped
  • 8 ounces carrots
  • ½ cup roughly chopped shallots
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon mild curry powder
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 8 cups low sodium chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
  • 1 cup apple juice or cider
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, more to taste
  • ½ cup Greek yogurt
  • ¼ freshly ground black pepper
  • salt, to taste

For the pumpkin seeds:

  • 1 teaspoon butter
  • ½ cup pepitas or pumpkin seeds
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoons mild curry powder
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 400˚F. Line a sheet pan will foil. Set aside.
  2. Cut squash and pumpkin in half. Scoop out seeds and stringy flesh. Drizzle a little olive oil on the prepared sheet pan. Place, cut side down, on sheet pan and roast for 30-40 minutes until very tender. Remove from oven and set aside till cool enough to handle.
  3. While squash and pumpkin are roasting, heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onions, carrots, and shallots and sauté for 3-4 minutes or until slightly translucent and soft. Add minced garlic, curry, and cinnamon and cook for another minute or until nice and fragrant.
  4. Add broth, apple juice/cider, and salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside till squash and pumpkin are finished baking.
  5. When squash and pumpkin* are tender. (Pierce them with a small thin-bladed knife to tell – it should insert really easily.) Set aside till cool enough to handle, then scoop out flesh and add to Dutch oven.
  6. Return mixture to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Remove from heat and puree with an immersion blender or transfer mixture, in several batches to a regular blender**. Puree until very smooth and silky. Add Greek yogurt and pepper and stir to combine.Taste and add more salt if needed (There are a lot of veggies to season in this soup so don’t hesitate to add more salt if the taste is bland.) You also may want to add a tablespoon or two of honey. My squash was very sweet and it didn’t need any extra sweetness. The description of the Panera soup does include honey.
  7. Serve hot with a generous scoop of the pumpkin seeds.

For the pumpkin seeds, melt butter in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add pumpkin seeds and stir to coat. Sprinkle with paprika, curry powder, and salt. Continue to cook for 2-3 minutes, stirring continuously, or until pepitas/seeds begin to turn golden. Taste and add a bit more salt, if needed. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.


We love to help our patients live healthy and pain-free lives! Same day appointments available.

Pain relief today – Health for a lifetime!

Core Chiropractic & Rehabilitation
216-313-9044


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